Who Saw Her Die? (1972)

If you see one movie where a father has sex instead of watching his daughter and spends the rest of the movie hunting her killing through the canals of Venice, you should probably watch Don’t Look Now. In fact, you may not even realize there’s another movie with the same plot. Actually, there is and to be honest, it’s really good. And believe it or not, this movie came out a year before Roeg’s. I’ve also heard this film compared to 1978’s The Bloodstained Shadow.

While at a French ski resort, a young girl wanders off and is murdered by a woman in a black veil, who then buries her body in the snow. Years later, the same thing happens in Venice, as Roberta (Nicoletta Elmi, DemonsA Bay of BloodFootprints on the Moon, The Night Child, Deep Red — when you needed a child actor in Italian horror films, she was the one you hired) is abducted and found drowned in the waters of that famous Italy town.

Now, her divorced parents — sculptor Franco (former James Bond George Lazenby) and Elizabeth (Anita Strindberg, The Antichrist) — must work together to discover who killed their daughter. That journey will take them into a world of darkness, sexual depravity and murder. And anyone that learns too much pays for those secrets with death.

The ending of this movie is astounding, with the killer set ablaze — to the apparent delight of Elizabeth — before they are launched out a window. And not to make a horrible pun, but it’s nearly a broken record to say that Morricone’s soundtrack may be the best part of this movie.

Director Aldo Lado is also responsible for Short Night of Glass Dolls and The Humanoid, two other movies well worth your time.

You can watch this movie on Amazon Prime.

2 thoughts on “Who Saw Her Die? (1972)”

  1. […] Look for Argento’s daughter Fiore as Angela and Ingrid the usherette is played by Nicoletta Elmi, who was the baron’s daughter in Andy Warhol’s Frankenstein, as well as appearing in  Baron Blood, A Bay of Blood and Who Saw Her Die? […]

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